Interactive Harris Family Tree

Joel Chandler Harris ardently loved his home and family, rarely leaving for visits or vacations. He preferred the company of his loved ones, writing on his front porch or in the family room rather than in the upstairs study set aside for that purpose, just to be closer to them.

This is the full Harris family tree, including descendants living today. Hover over or click the green circles with plus signs to find out more about the associated family member in this educational interactive. The Harris offspring are fascinating in themselves and include one who shared the first Pulitzer Prize ever awarded to a Georgian.

Information about later generations will be coming soon.

Joel Chandler Harris

1848-1908

Joel Chandler Harris lived at The Wren’s Nest with his family from 1881 until he died in 1908. He was a lifelong journalist, working at The Atlanta Constitution for 24 years as both a humorous “paragrapher” (or editorialist) and an editor. He was also a popular author, famously compiling the Brer Rabbit stories he heard as a young boy into books that became international bestsellers. After Harris’s death, his fans and supporters rallied together to make his home a museum to preserve his legacy, making The Wren’s Nest the first historic house museum in Georgia. You can find out more about Joel Chandler Harris here.

Mary Esther LaRose

1834-1938

Mary Esther LaRose Harris, or “Essie,” was a small, dainty woman with an alert mind, a dauntless spirit, and a keen sense of humor. Born a French Canadian, she came to live in Georgia when she met Joel Chandler Harris on a trip to Savannah with her parents, Esther DuPont LaRose and Pierre LaRose, a ship captain who plied the south Atlantic coast. The two were married on April 21, 1873, and throughout their marriage, Essie was a constant, effective influence in her husband’s life. She was also his protector, keeping fans and press away from the chronically shy author. Essie was a religious woman, volunteering with the local Catholic Church and helping to found St. Anthony’s parish in the West End neighborhood.

Julian LaRose

1874-1963

Julian LaRose Harris was Esther and Joel Chandler Harris’s first born. He quickly followed in his journalist father’s footsteps, becoming the news editor for The Atlanta Constitution before his twenty-first birthday and the managing editor at twenty-four. He married Julia Florida Collier Harris in October 1897. The talented writer and his wife later became the owners and editors of The Columbus Enquirer Sun. In 1926, the couple won a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for their coverage of the Scopes Monkey Trial (the famous trail about teaching evolution in schools), their “brave and energetic fight against the Ku Klux Klan,” and their public stance against lynching.

Lucien LaRose

1875-1960

Lucien LaRose Harris was Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris’s second son, born just 18 months after his older brother Julian. His family affectionately called him “Tootsie” growing up. Eventually, “Tootsie” became an insurance executive, vice president of the Atlanta Park Board, and the youngest Fulton County Treasurer. He was also the first of the Harris children to marry, wedding Aileen Zachary in December 1895. The couple had six children, four boys and two girls - just like Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris.

Evan Howell

1876-1878

Evan Howell Harris, Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris’s third son, was named in honor of the then editor-in-chief of The Atlanta Constitution, the newspaper at which Joel Chandler Harris worked. His namesake was “to become one of [his] father’s warmest and stanchest friends.” Sadly, in May 1878, Joel Chandler Harris caught the measles, which all three children then contracted, and baby Evan Howell did not survive.

 

Evelyn

1878-1961

Evelyn Harris (or sometimes “Ev”) was born in Upton, Quebec, Canada, while his mother, Esther LaRose Harris, was visiting her parents there. The self-proclaimed “Mamma’s Boy” spent more time with Esther than with his older brothers growing up and eventually wrote a booklet entitled, “Little Book About My Mother,” which shares stories about Esther LaRose. Like his brothers and father Joel, Evelyn worked for The Atlanta Constitution newspaper for a time as their city editor. In 1906, he left the Constitution to become the “advertising man” for the Bell Telephone Company in the South’s (or Southern Bell) Telephone News. In 1913, he became one of the four founding members of the Atlanta Rotary Club.

Mary Esther

1879-1882

Mary Esther Harris, or “Rosebud,” was the first daughter of Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris. The parents were thrilled, particularly Joel, who “had ardently wished for a little girl.” Her father took her birth as a sign of “good luck” since his wish for a daughter was granted at the same time that he was beginning to have success as a writer. Tragically, though, Mary Esther died suddenly of diphtheria shortly before her third birthday.

Lillian

1882-1956

Lillian Harris was born shortly after the Harris’s first daughter died. As their son, Evelyn, later explained, “Both mother and father welcomed each baby as a gift from heaven, but both were definitely more partial to girls.” Joel Chandler Harris even dedicated his book, Tales of the Home Folks in Peace and War (1898) to Lillian. The dedication reads: “To My Daughter Lillian who will know why I included in Tales of the Home Folks the little skit about our friends in St. Valerien.” Lillian’s nickname was “Billy Ann,” “Billy,” or “Bill.” She was the daughter who loved dolls - in contrast to her tomboy sister, Mildred. Eventually, Lillian married “Fritz” Wagener and they had two children.

Linton Edward

1883-1890

Linton Edward Harris was described as a boy with a “gentle, affectionate, endearing nature” and whose “little soul was sensitively attuned to all that was lovely around him.” Linton died just after his seventh birthday when he suddenly contracted diphtheria. The Harris family was deeply affected by Linton’s death. His oldest brother, Julian, was devastated as Linton was his favorite sibling, his “partner,” and the younger son passed while Julian was at school in Canada. Joel Chandler Harris was also heartbroken and wrote a tribute to Linton in The Atlanta Constitution entitled, “The Death of a Little Boy.”

Mildred

1885-1966

Mildred Harris was the “tomboy” Harris daughter, hence her nickname “Tommy.” She was fun-loving and energetic, galloping across the yard on the family’s donkey, Nelly, and pulling pranks on her younger brother, Jake. Mildred and her sister Lillian attended St. Joseph’s Academy, a boarding school, and later attended Agnes Scott College. While they were at school, Harris wrote them numerous letters filled with stories of home and advice on everything from writing and school to friendship and boys. Mildred married Edwin Camp and they had two daughters. When Esther LaRose Harris moved out of The Wren’s Nest so it could become a museum, she lived with Mildred until she passed in 1938.

Joel Chandler Jr.

1888-1964

Joel Chandler “Jake” Harris Jr. was Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris’s youngest child. He was born at The Wren’s Nest and as a young boy was a prankster (just like his father), playing jokes on his sister Mildred. When he was 13 years old, he “became considerably stuck on the game” of baseball, begging to go to all the Georgia Tech games. Fittingly, Jake later became the sports editor for The Atlanta Constitution. He then was an advertising executive, president of the Atlanta Rotary Club (1934-35), and the District Governor of Rotary International (1936). Jake was married twice, first to Hazelle Pancoast and then to Dorothy “Dot” Cooke Dean after Hazelle died. He never had any children.

Aileen Zachry

1876-1958

Aileen Zachry Harris was the daughter of William Inus and Mary Harris Zachry, “pioneer settlers” of Atlanta. In a letter to Lucien, Joel Chandler Harris said, “the great thing about [Aileen] is her independence… there is nothing small, or mean or foolish about her.” Aileen and Lucien were married in 1985 and spent their first year of marriage at The Wren’s Nest. Aileen was active in local civic and church activities. She was also a member of the Joel Chandler Harris Memorial Association (which ran The Wren’s Nest after it became a museum).

Virginia Louise

1920-1922

Virginia Louise, daughter of Lucien Harris Jr. and Louise Nicholas, was named for her mother. She was never far from the sight of her parents, but shortly before her 2nd birthday, tragedy struck. According to the family folklore, Virginia was left with the next-door neighbor for a short time and, since it was close to her birthday, the neighbor baked Virginia a surprise birthday cake. Unfortunately, the toddler became sick and died just two days before her 2nd birthday on June 16, 1922. The family believes Virginia was allergic to either the eggs or milk in the cake.

Charles Collier

1899-1903

Charles Collier (pictured above, on the right) was named for his grandfather Charles Augustus Collier. But according to his mother, Julia Collier Harris, he was more like his grandfather Joel Chandler Harris. He was “the only grandchild who had the red hair and bright blue eyes of his Grandfather Harris, and he resembled his grandfather, too, in disposition, being endowed with that combination of gentleness, mischievousness, and whimsicality so often found in red-haired boys. He and his grandfather were on very loving terms.” Unfortunately, just days after Christmas in 1903, Charles was taken ill and never recovered. He died when he was just four years old.

Elizabeth Camp Chapman

1912-1996

Elizabeth Camp Chapman was the daughter of Mildred Harris and Edwin Camp. Her family lived next door to the Wren’s Nest and Elizabeth remained in Atlanta for most of the rest of her life. She married Matthew M. Chapman and they had two sons. Elizabeth was a graduate of the University of Georgia, a lifelong member of Christ the King Catholic Church, and a claims analyst for Equifax. For 15 years, she was a volunteer tour guide at The Wren’s Nest. Although she never met her grandfather, Joel Chandler Harris, Elizabeth shared family stories and letters about the famous author on her tours. The former Executive Director of the museum, Carole Mumford, said Elizabeth “had this wry, wonderful sense of humor, a great laugh, and she loved a good story.”

Julia Collier

1875-1967

Julia Collier Harris pursued a career as an illustrator until her mother’s death in 1896, when she returned home to help her father care for her six younger siblings. She married Julian Harris in October 1897. In 1902, the couple moved into a new home just down the road from The Wren’s Nest with their two young sons, two of Julia’s sisters, and one of her brothers. She began her journalism career in 1907, contributing articles to the Uncle Remus Magazine. She went on to become an accomplished journalist and writer. She and Julian co-owned the Columbus Enquirer-Sun, using the newspaper to further Progressive reform. In her writing, Julia courageously spoke out against illiteracy, corruption, racial injustice, and anti-evolutionists. She covered both the Treaty of Versailles and the Scopes Trial. In 1926, she and Julian won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. Julia also wrote two biographies of her father-in-law. She retired from journalism in 1936 but continued to advise and encourage young writers up until she died in 1967. She was inducted into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame in 2019.

Lucien III

1923-1996

Lucien Harris was born in 1923, the son of Lucien Jr. and Virginia Louise Nicholas. He became a Navy aviator, fighting in WWII. After the war, Lucien graduated from Emory University Business School and then became a banker. However, Lucien III’s passion was for art. He taught himself to paint and his work primarily featured natural subjects like birds and butterflies, heavily inspired by his father’s own love of nature as a lepidopterist. The majority of his paintings are now housed at The Bascom Center for Visual Arts in Highlands, N.C. - where Lucien lived from 1981-1996.

Lucien IV

1953-1970

Lucien Harris IV was the only son of Lucien III and Mary Jane Harris. His nickname was “Buzz” or “Buzzy.” He and his family lived in Orlando, Florida. Unfortunately, when Buzzy was 17 years old, he died during a skin-diving accident at the Clearwater Pass Bridge. He was a student at Edgewater High School where he was a member of the National Honor Society, was the president of the Spanish Honor Society, and played on the soccer team. Buzzy was the last male of Joel Chandler Harris’s descendants to bear the Harris last name.

Lucien Jr.

1899-1983

Lucien LaRose Harris, Jr. was born September 9, 1899, in Atlanta, Georgia. The third son of Lucien Harris and Aileen Zachry, he was a storyteller extraordinaire with an infectious laugh and a gentle spirit. He sold textbooks for McMillan, traveling the state and talking to schoolchildren about his memories of his grandfather, Joel Chandler Harris. Lucien Jr. was a naturalist at heart, collecting butterflies, mounting and preserving them in cases until he amassed such a collection that he built a special “butterfly room” behind his home. He eventually turned his avocation into a book called Butterflies of Georgia, published in 1972.

Pierre LaRose

Pierre LaRose Harris was named for his great-grandfather (Esther LaRose’s father). Joel Chandler Harris once said Pierre was the “finest baby [he] ever saw” and described him as “such a pink and white baby, as clean as a bowl of rice.” According to his mother, Julia Collier Harris, he had the same coloring as Mary “Rosebud” Harris. Like Rosebud, he also died young, at just under three years old and only four months after his only brother, Charles, died.

Remus Anthony

1916-1979

Remus Anthony Harris was the youngest child of Lucien and Aileen Harris. Remus distinguished himself as a songwriter with seven #1 hit songs. This included, “Cry Baby Cry” in 1939, which was Judy Garland’s first record and sold millions of copies, and “So Long” in 1940, which was recorded by Ella Fitzgerald and featured on “The Kate Smith Hour” radio show. Remus married Frieda Ackermann in 1941 and the couple moved to their 5th Avenue apartment in New York City shortly after. When Remus was 31, he became one of the top advertising executives in New York.

Mary Harris Rowsey

1908-1979

Mary Harris Rowsey was the second daughter of Aileen and Lucien Harris. She married Frank Rowsey and the couple never had any children. Like many members of her family - including her grandfather Joel Chandler Harris - Mary pursued a journalism career. She was the society editor of The Atlanta Constitution until 1953. Her recurring column, called,“Just Ramblin’,” launched in 1943, reporting on social and cultural events like fashion, weddings, births, and local gossip. Also, like Joel Chandler Harris, Mary’s home was known by a clever name: the “Briar Patch,” a nod to Brer Rabbit’s home in her grandfather’s famous books.

Lillian LaRose

1908-

Lillian “Rose” LaRose, daughter of Lillian Harris and Fritz Wagener, was born at The Wren’s Nest in 1908. Lillian married James Nicholas Grant, moved to North Carolina, and raised their son James “Jim” Jr. while also teaching kindergarten out of their home. After Jim went to college, Lillian volunteered at the Sunshine Day Nursery, established when a growing number of women began working. Lillian eventually became the school’s director, a position she held for 30 years. The Charity League later established The LaRose Grant Award in her memory, which honors a member every year for exceptional service. The League remembered Lillian for her “high standards in the nursery, the kindness and stability that she provided the children, and of course, her collection of rabbit figurines.”

  • Joel Chandler Harris

    1848-1908

    Joel Chandler Harris lived at The Wren’s Nest with his family from 1881 until he died in 1908. He was a lifelong journalist, working at The Atlanta Constitution for 24 years as both a humorous “paragrapher” (or editorialist) and an editor. He was also a popular author, famously compiling the Brer Rabbit stories he heard as a young boy into books that became international bestsellers. After Harris’s death, his fans and supporters rallied together to make his home a museum to preserve his legacy, making The Wren’s Nest the first historic house museum in Georgia. You can find out more about Joel Chandler Harris here.

  • Mary Esther LaRose

    1834-1938

    Mary Esther LaRose Harris, or “Essie,” was a small, dainty woman with an alert mind, a dauntless spirit, and a keen sense of humor. Born a French Canadian, she came to live in Georgia when she met Joel Chandler Harris on a trip to Savannah with her parents, Esther DuPont LaRose and Pierre LaRose, a ship captain who plied the south Atlantic coast. The two were married on April 21, 1873, and throughout their marriage, Essie was a constant, effective influence in her husband’s life. She was also his protector, keeping fans and press away from the chronically shy author. Essie was a religious woman, volunteering with the local Catholic Church and helping to found St. Anthony’s parish in the West End neighborhood.

  • Julian LaRose

    1874-1963

    Julian LaRose Harris was Esther and Joel Chandler Harris’s first born. He quickly followed in his journalist father’s footsteps, becoming the news editor for The Atlanta Constitution before his twenty-first birthday and the managing editor at twenty-four. He married Julia Florida Collier Harris in October 1897. The talented writer and his wife later became the owners and editors of The Columbus Enquirer Sun. In 1926, the couple won a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for their coverage of the Scopes Monkey Trial (the famous trail about teaching evolution in schools), their “brave and energetic fight against the Ku Klux Klan,” and their public stance against lynching.

  • Lucien LaRose

    1875-1960

    Lucien LaRose Harris was Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris’s second son, born just 18 months after his older brother Julian. His family affectionately called him “Tootsie” growing up. Eventually, “Tootsie” became an insurance executive, vice president of the Atlanta Park Board, and the youngest Fulton County Treasurer. He was also the first of the Harris children to marry, wedding Aileen Zachary in December 1895. The couple had six children, four boys and two girls - just like Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris.

  • Evan Howell

    1876-1878

    Evan Howell Harris, Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris’s third son, was named in honor of the then editor-in-chief of The Atlanta Constitution, the newspaper at which Joel Chandler Harris worked. His namesake was “to become one of [his] father’s warmest and stanchest friends.” Sadly, in May 1878, Joel Chandler Harris caught the measles, which all three children then contracted, and baby Evan Howell did not survive.

     

  • Evelyn

    1878-1961

    Evelyn Harris (or sometimes “Ev”) was born in Upton, Quebec, Canada, while his mother, Esther LaRose Harris, was visiting her parents there. The self-proclaimed “Mamma’s Boy” spent more time with Esther than with his older brothers growing up and eventually wrote a booklet entitled, “Little Book About My Mother,” which shares stories about Esther LaRose. Like his brothers and father Joel, Evelyn worked for The Atlanta Constitution newspaper for a time as their city editor. In 1906, he left the Constitution to become the “advertising man” for the Bell Telephone Company in the South’s (or Southern Bell) Telephone News. In 1913, he became one of the four founding members of the Atlanta Rotary Club.

  • Mary Esther

    1879-1882

    Mary Esther Harris, or “Rosebud,” was the first daughter of Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris. The parents were thrilled, particularly Joel, who “had ardently wished for a little girl.” Her father took her birth as a sign of “good luck” since his wish for a daughter was granted at the same time that he was beginning to have success as a writer. Tragically, though, Mary Esther died suddenly of diphtheria shortly before her third birthday.

  • Lillian

    1882-1956

    Lillian Harris was born shortly after the Harris’s first daughter died. As their son, Evelyn, later explained, “Both mother and father welcomed each baby as a gift from heaven, but both were definitely more partial to girls.” Joel Chandler Harris even dedicated his book, Tales of the Home Folks in Peace and War (1898) to Lillian. The dedication reads: “To My Daughter Lillian who will know why I included in Tales of the Home Folks the little skit about our friends in St. Valerien.” Lillian’s nickname was “Billy Ann,” “Billy,” or “Bill.” She was the daughter who loved dolls - in contrast to her tomboy sister, Mildred. Eventually, Lillian married “Fritz” Wagener and they had two children.

  • Linton Edward

    1883-1890

    Linton Edward Harris was described as a boy with a “gentle, affectionate, endearing nature” and whose “little soul was sensitively attuned to all that was lovely around him.” Linton died just after his seventh birthday when he suddenly contracted diphtheria. The Harris family was deeply affected by Linton’s death. His oldest brother, Julian, was devastated as Linton was his favorite sibling, his “partner,” and the younger son passed while Julian was at school in Canada. Joel Chandler Harris was also heartbroken and wrote a tribute to Linton in The Atlanta Constitution entitled, “The Death of a Little Boy.”

  • Mildred

    1885-1966

    Mildred Harris was the “tomboy” Harris daughter, hence her nickname “Tommy.” She was fun-loving and energetic, galloping across the yard on the family’s donkey, Nelly, and pulling pranks on her younger brother, Jake. Mildred and her sister Lillian attended St. Joseph’s Academy, a boarding school, and later attended Agnes Scott College. While they were at school, Harris wrote them numerous letters filled with stories of home and advice on everything from writing and school to friendship and boys. Mildred married Edwin Camp and they had two daughters. When Esther LaRose Harris moved out of The Wren’s Nest so it could become a museum, she lived with Mildred until she passed in 1938.

  • Joel Chandler Jr.

    1888-1964

    Joel Chandler “Jake” Harris Jr. was Esther LaRose and Joel Chandler Harris’s youngest child. He was born at The Wren’s Nest and as a young boy was a prankster (just like his father), playing jokes on his sister Mildred. When he was 13 years old, he “became considerably stuck on the game” of baseball, begging to go to all the Georgia Tech games. Fittingly, Jake later became the sports editor for The Atlanta Constitution. He then was an advertising executive, president of the Atlanta Rotary Club (1934-35), and the District Governor of Rotary International (1936). Jake was married twice, first to Hazelle Pancoast and then to Dorothy “Dot” Cooke Dean after Hazelle died. He never had any children.

  • Aileen Zachry

    1876-1958

    Aileen Zachry Harris was the daughter of William Inus and Mary Harris Zachry, “pioneer settlers” of Atlanta. In a letter to Lucien, Joel Chandler Harris said, “the great thing about [Aileen] is her independence… there is nothing small, or mean or foolish about her.” Aileen and Lucien were married in 1985 and spent their first year of marriage at The Wren’s Nest. Aileen was active in local civic and church activities. She was also a member of the Joel Chandler Harris Memorial Association (which ran The Wren’s Nest after it became a museum).

  • Virginia Louise

    1920-1922

    Virginia Louise, daughter of Lucien Harris Jr. and Louise Nicholas, was named for her mother. She was never far from the sight of her parents, but shortly before her 2nd birthday, tragedy struck. According to the family folklore, Virginia was left with the next-door neighbor for a short time and, since it was close to her birthday, the neighbor baked Virginia a surprise birthday cake. Unfortunately, the toddler became sick and died just two days before her 2nd birthday on June 16, 1922. The family believes Virginia was allergic to either the eggs or milk in the cake.

  • Charles Collier

    1899-1903

    Charles Collier (pictured above, on the right) was named for his grandfather Charles Augustus Collier. But according to his mother, Julia Collier Harris, he was more like his grandfather Joel Chandler Harris. He was “the only grandchild who had the red hair and bright blue eyes of his Grandfather Harris, and he resembled his grandfather, too, in disposition, being endowed with that combination of gentleness, mischievousness, and whimsicality so often found in red-haired boys. He and his grandfather were on very loving terms.” Unfortunately, just days after Christmas in 1903, Charles was taken ill and never recovered. He died when he was just four years old.

  • Elizabeth Camp Chapman

    1912-1996

    Elizabeth Camp Chapman was the daughter of Mildred Harris and Edwin Camp. Her family lived next door to the Wren’s Nest and Elizabeth remained in Atlanta for most of the rest of her life. She married Matthew M. Chapman and they had two sons. Elizabeth was a graduate of the University of Georgia, a lifelong member of Christ the King Catholic Church, and a claims analyst for Equifax. For 15 years, she was a volunteer tour guide at The Wren’s Nest. Although she never met her grandfather, Joel Chandler Harris, Elizabeth shared family stories and letters about the famous author on her tours. The former Executive Director of the museum, Carole Mumford, said Elizabeth “had this wry, wonderful sense of humor, a great laugh, and she loved a good story.”

  • Julia Collier

    1875-1967

    Julia Collier Harris pursued a career as an illustrator until her mother’s death in 1896, when she returned home to help her father care for her six younger siblings. She married Julian Harris in October 1897. In 1902, the couple moved into a new home just down the road from The Wren’s Nest with their two young sons, two of Julia’s sisters, and one of her brothers. She began her journalism career in 1907, contributing articles to the Uncle Remus Magazine. She went on to become an accomplished journalist and writer. She and Julian co-owned the Columbus Enquirer-Sun, using the newspaper to further Progressive reform. In her writing, Julia courageously spoke out against illiteracy, corruption, racial injustice, and anti-evolutionists. She covered both the Treaty of Versailles and the Scopes Trial. In 1926, she and Julian won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. Julia also wrote two biographies of her father-in-law. She retired from journalism in 1936 but continued to advise and encourage young writers up until she died in 1967. She was inducted into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame in 2019.

  • Lucien III

    1923-1996

    Lucien Harris was born in 1923, the son of Lucien Jr. and Virginia Louise Nicholas. He became a Navy aviator, fighting in WWII. After the war, Lucien graduated from Emory University Business School and then became a banker. However, Lucien III’s passion was for art. He taught himself to paint and his work primarily featured natural subjects like birds and butterflies, heavily inspired by his father’s own love of nature as a lepidopterist. The majority of his paintings are now housed at The Bascom Center for Visual Arts in Highlands, N.C. - where Lucien lived from 1981-1996.

  • Lucien IV

    1953-1970

    Lucien Harris IV was the only son of Lucien III and Mary Jane Harris. His nickname was “Buzz” or “Buzzy.” He and his family lived in Orlando, Florida. Unfortunately, when Buzzy was 17 years old, he died during a skin-diving accident at the Clearwater Pass Bridge. He was a student at Edgewater High School where he was a member of the National Honor Society, was the president of the Spanish Honor Society, and played on the soccer team. Buzzy was the last male of Joel Chandler Harris’s descendants to bear the Harris last name.

  • Lucien Jr.

    1899-1983

    Lucien LaRose Harris, Jr. was born September 9, 1899, in Atlanta, Georgia. The third son of Lucien Harris and Aileen Zachry, he was a storyteller extraordinaire with an infectious laugh and a gentle spirit. He sold textbooks for McMillan, traveling the state and talking to schoolchildren about his memories of his grandfather, Joel Chandler Harris. Lucien Jr. was a naturalist at heart, collecting butterflies, mounting and preserving them in cases until he amassed such a collection that he built a special “butterfly room” behind his home. He eventually turned his avocation into a book called Butterflies of Georgia, published in 1972.

  • Pierre LaRose

    Pierre LaRose Harris was named for his great-grandfather (Esther LaRose’s father). Joel Chandler Harris once said Pierre was the “finest baby [he] ever saw” and described him as “such a pink and white baby, as clean as a bowl of rice.” According to his mother, Julia Collier Harris, he had the same coloring as Mary “Rosebud” Harris. Like Rosebud, he also died young, at just under three years old and only four months after his only brother, Charles, died.

  • Remus Anthony

    1916-1979

    Remus Anthony Harris was the youngest child of Lucien and Aileen Harris. Remus distinguished himself as a songwriter with seven #1 hit songs. This included, “Cry Baby Cry” in 1939, which was Judy Garland’s first record and sold millions of copies, and “So Long” in 1940, which was recorded by Ella Fitzgerald and featured on “The Kate Smith Hour” radio show. Remus married Frieda Ackermann in 1941 and the couple moved to their 5th Avenue apartment in New York City shortly after. When Remus was 31, he became one of the top advertising executives in New York.

  • Mary Harris Rowsey

    1908-1979

    Mary Harris Rowsey was the second daughter of Aileen and Lucien Harris. She married Frank Rowsey and the couple never had any children. Like many members of her family - including her grandfather Joel Chandler Harris - Mary pursued a journalism career. She was the society editor of The Atlanta Constitution until 1953. Her recurring column, called,“Just Ramblin’,” launched in 1943, reporting on social and cultural events like fashion, weddings, births, and local gossip. Also, like Joel Chandler Harris, Mary’s home was known by a clever name: the “Briar Patch,” a nod to Brer Rabbit’s home in her grandfather’s famous books.

  • Lillian LaRose

    1908-

    Lillian “Rose” LaRose, daughter of Lillian Harris and Fritz Wagener, was born at The Wren’s Nest in 1908. Lillian married James Nicholas Grant, moved to North Carolina, and raised their son James “Jim” Jr. while also teaching kindergarten out of their home. After Jim went to college, Lillian volunteered at the Sunshine Day Nursery, established when a growing number of women began working. Lillian eventually became the school’s director, a position she held for 30 years. The Charity League later established The LaRose Grant Award in her memory, which honors a member every year for exceptional service. The League remembered Lillian for her “high standards in the nursery, the kindness and stability that she provided the children, and of course, her collection of rabbit figurines.”

This educational interactive was made possible by a generous grant from Georgia Humanities.

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